Tom Brake shows support for people living with incurable secondary breast cancer

Tom Brake MP is calling for better data collection to improve the care and treatment available for women with incurable secondary breast cancer. He was prompted to act after a meeting with Breast Cancer Care and victims in Parliament this week.

Currently data for primary breast cancer is recorded, yet no accurate figures exist around the number of people diagnosed or living with incurable secondary breast cancer. Breast Cancer Care believes the poor care that people with the disease often receive is due to these missing numbers making it nearly impossible to plan the vital services needed.

Tom said:

“It is extremely important to show support for secondary breast cancer patients. It is shocking we still don’t have accurate data on those living with the incurable disease and this must be made a priority. So, I am calling on the Government to do more to support people affected by the disease.”

Tom has written to local health providers asking for confirmation that statistics are being collected and acted on locally.

Danni Manzi, Head of Policy & Campaigns at Breast Cancer Care, said:

“We are extremely grateful to Tom for coming along to our event and showing his support. Only when we have the full picture about the numbers living with the disease can we make informed decisions to ensure care services are planned effectively and that everyone affected by secondary breast cancer gets the support they need from day one.”

Find out more about secondary breast cancer and how to get involved with Breast Cancer Care’s campaign here.  

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